“Que eu não perca a vontade de doar este enorme amor que existe em meu coração, mesmo sabendo que muitas vezes ele será submetido a provas e até rejeitado.”

Renda-se, como eu me rendi. Mergulhe no que você não conhece como eu mergulhei. Não se preocupe em entender, viver ultrapassa qualquer entendimento.

Nossas vidas são definidas por momentos. Principalmente aqueles que nos pegam de surpresa.

rhamphotheca:

A Late Pummeling For Earth
by Richard A. Kerr
From the Mars-size object that slammed into our planet 4.5 billion years ago, forming the moon, to a bombardment that boiled off early oceans as recently as 2.5 billion years ago, Earth has taken some massive stonings in its lifetime. Now scientists think they know where the rocks were coming from. In a paper published online today in Nature, planetary dynamicists finger the now-depleted inner edge of the asteroid belt, located just outside the orbit of Mars.


Researchers had previously proposed that Jupiter and Saturn wandered toward the sun about 4 billion years ago, gravitationally slinging asteroids toward Earth as they went. But new computer simulations suggest that these planets would have also flung some innermost asteroids into inclined, but not perfectly stable, orbits. Slowly, these asteroids escaped from these orbits, pummeling Earth for billions of years to come.
(via: Science NOW)       (image: Don Davis/NASA)

rhamphotheca:

A Late Pummeling For Earth

by Richard A. Kerr

From the Mars-size object that slammed into our planet 4.5 billion years ago, forming the moon, to a bombardment that boiled off early oceans as recently as 2.5 billion years ago, Earth has taken some massive stonings in its lifetime. Now scientists think they know where the rocks were coming from. In a paper published online today in Nature, planetary dynamicists finger the now-depleted inner edge of the asteroid belt, located just outside the orbit of Mars.

Researchers had previously proposed that Jupiter and Saturn wandered toward the sun about 4 billion years ago, gravitationally slinging asteroids toward Earth as they went. But new computer simulations suggest that these planets would have also flung some innermost asteroids into inclined, but not perfectly stable, orbits. Slowly, these asteroids escaped from these orbits, pummeling Earth for billions of years to come.

(via: Science NOW)       (image: Don Davis/NASA)